Twilight Fauna and Jennifer Christensen – Split

Rating: 3.5/5
Distributor/label: Red River Family Records
Distributor/label URL: http://redriverfamily.bigcartel.com/
Released: 2015
Buy Album [URL]: http://redriverfamily.bigcartel.com/
Website: https://twilightfauna.bandcamp.com/ and https://jenniferchristensen.bandcamp.com/

Split AlbumBand Line Up:

Twilight Fauna: All instrumentation.
Jennifer Christensen: All instrumentation.

Tracklistings:

1. Jennifer Christensen – Sickness Unto Death
2. Twilight Fauna – Crossing The Threshold

Review:

This spilt sees a collaboration between composer Jennifer Christensen and one-man atmospheric metal project Twilight Fauna to create something outside of genre limitations. This is an expression of the deeply emotional content surrounding grief and loss.

Christensen, who is best known for her solo work in Møllehøj takes a unique stance with this acoustic, dissonant and unharmonious classical piece. This multi-instrumentalist has created a melancholic and sometimes heartbreakingly sad composition, ‘Sickness Unto Death’ is a grieving process. From the first note of this sombre introduction in the violin and cello we are overcome by this bleak and desolate atmosphere. There are a few moments where the tuning doesn’t quite feel intentional but this could be part of her compositional technique. Repetition of phrases, staccato bowing, the presence of basso continuo and solo violin combines into a wonderfully unsettling passage before the pace settles once again into overwhelming loss.

Twilight Fauna is the work of Paul Ravenwood, known for his use of folk instrumentation alongside black metal in creation of depressive and atmospheric soundscapes. ‘Crossing the Threshold’ conveys loss in a captivating, empty and isolating composition.The soft introduction is quickly shattered by Ravenwood’s black metal guitar work and the barely audible, unearthly whispering makes this rather unnerving. This track smothers you in distortion with a more conventional atmospheric black metal sound, leaving you feeling pretty empty by its conclusion.

Review by Helena Byrne
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