Hypermass – Clouded Visions [EP]

Rating: 3/5
Distributor/Label: Independent
Released: 2015
Buy Album:  http://hypermass.bandcamp.com/releases
Band Website: https://www.facebook.com/hypermassmetal

Clouded VisionsBand Line-up:

Marius Gringflek: Bass
Brage Krabol: Drums
Thomas Pedersen : Guitars
Sindre Dagestad: Guitars
Markus Sundet: Vocals

Tracklisting:

1. Intro
2. Ionize
3. Embracing Erasion
4. In The Final Stage Of Embryonic Mutation
5. Clouded Visions

Review:

Hailing from Trondheim, Norway, Hypermass are a melodic Death Metal in the fine Scandinavian tradition. “Clouded Visions” is their debut release, an EP, which I’m sure the band hope will turn heads in the same manner as their “Into Oblivion” demo.

The EP kicks off with “Intro”, a somewhat trite take on the old calm-before-the-storm routine. It shuffles along in unremarkable melodic fashion, failing to really take up space in the memory. It is followed with considerable force by “Ionize”, a discordant, slightly vicious exercise in groovy melodic death dynamics. One small criticism is that the track comes across as a touch formulaic. The same can be said for “Embracing Erasion”, which very much ploughs the same furrow, lifted by some impressively muscular drumming by Brage Krabol. “In The Final Stage Of Embryonic Mutation” offers a welcome injection of adrenaline with it’s sinewy and crunchy method of attack.

The EP rounds off with its coup de grace, the antithetically epic title track, showing the band firing on all cylinders, having tapped a rich vein of inspiration. The song breaks down delightfully with a wondrously introspective picked guitar section replete with a tasteful classical solo recalling Opeth at their most whimsical.

Hypermass are clearly a band who have drawn inspiration from the Scandiavian brethren, in particular At The Gates. The opening tracks come across as lackadaisical and a bit cliche ridden. Thankfully the final two tracks are of the finest quality and hopefully offer up a hint of what is in store for the future. A band with potential.

Review by Owen Thompson

 

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