NERO DI MARTE – DERIVAE

Rating: 4.5/5
Distributor/label: Prosthetic Records
Released: 2014
Buy album: http://prostheticrecords.backstreetmerch.com/artist/nero-di-marte/cds/derivae-cd
Band website: http://www.nerodimarte.com/


derivaeBAND LINE-UP:

Andrea Burgio – Bass
Marco Bolognini – Drums
Francesco D’Adamo – Guitars
Sean Worrell – Guitars/Vocals

TRACKLISTING:

1. L’Eclisse
2. Clouded Allure
3. Pulsar
4. Dite
5. Simulacra
6. Il Diluvio
7. Those Who Leave

REVIEW:

Out in the market for a month now, the second album of these Italian youngsters promises to cause a fuss among the prog community, just like the self-titled debut did early last year. The way they’re able to entwine progressive and atmospheric metal is just enthralling!

“Derivae” means “adrift” in their mother tongue and it was chosen as title given the lyrical content, which, quoting singer/guitarist Sean Worrell, is “tragically searching for something that maybe isn’t there… letting yourself go and becoming swayed by the unknown”. But even if you don’t understand what Worrell is singing – due to the harsh tone, that is; there are two songs in Italian but the majority of the lyrics are in English – that’s exactly the idea the music will pass on to you: a feeling of being lost.

The aforementioned harsh tone is full of both despair and anger, because we all know how frustrating uncertainty can become, but I dare adding another reason why this title is more than suitable is that the listener will be engulfed by all these sounds and emotions and will let himself be carried away… carried adrift.

Without being excessively technical, the guitar work will still make your head spin and one could expect nothing less than a thick groove resonating from the bass strings and the precision of the drums, no matter the pace of the beats, no matter the variations within the pace of those beats. Then you read that there hasn’t been any digital post-processing, meaning this is all raw, old-school analogical recording, mixing and mastering… you just go “wow” about these guys.

It’s hard to pinpoint highlights, but let’s see…the atmosphere-gone-extreme of “Dite”, making it sound quite doom-ish., the drum patterns in “Il Diluvio”, the hypnotic intro of “Those Who Leave”, the weird/ominous/psychedelic/ break in the middle of “Pulsar” and pretty much everything about “Clouded Allure”!

REVIEW BY RENATA LINO
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