Tristana – Virtual Crime

Rating: 3/5
Distributor/label: Bakerteam Records
Distributor/label URL: http://www.bakerteamrecords.com/
Released: 2015
Buy Album: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Virtual-Crime-Tristana/dp/B00TKNQZVG
Band Website: http://www.tristana.sk

 rsz_cover_frontBAND LINEUP:

Peter Wilsen- vocals
Dusan Homer- guitars
Laco Krabac- bass
Andrea Almasi- keyboards
Roman Lasso- drums

TRACKLISTING:

01. Resurrection
02. Fallen
03. Wasted Time
04. Bloody Snow
05. Beg For Death
06. Jannie’s Dying
07. Belladonna Deadly Nightshade
08. Killer
09. Lost The Whole Life
10. Hunting Fever
11. Ending Outro

Review:

When a band comes along with a name like Tristana you can’t question their aspirations, but the first thing you doubt is their creativity. Just one letter away from Tristania, surely this is just another clone band? Surprisingly, that’s not the case.

The first track “Resurrection” opens with some cheesy synths, while the underlying guitar riffs give the track a nu-metal vibe. And then all of a sudden the soaring male vocals start and the song bursts into a full-on power metal frenzy, complete with a keyboard solo in the most cliché synth preset known to man.

“Jannie’s Dying” starts with a twinkling keyboard melody and some female vocals that wouldn’t sound out of place in a 90s dance hit. Later on it gets even better: “Where is your love? Where is your love baby?” All that’s missing is the four-to-the-floor kick. It’s as though the rap interlude is going to be sprung upon us any minute, but fortunately it isn’t.

With “Belladonna Deadly Nightshade” some gothic influences come through with the clean and resonant guitars. The song quickly switches to some heavier passages and makes use of some growled vocals.

The album is full on and in your face, like the hyperactive lovechild of Linkin Park and Sonata Arctica experiencing chronic mood swings. The music shifts and turns so frequently that it’s hard to tell whether it actually works or the different parts of the arrangements are just trying to run away from each other.

By the end of the album I certainly don’t doubt their creativity, but I am left wondering if nu-gothic power metal needs to exist. Whether it needs to or not, now it’s stuck in my head whether I like it or not. It’s something that by my standards I shouldn’t like, but I can’t help liking it.

REVIEW BY JACOB OVINGTON
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