Australasia – Notturno (Night)

Rating: 4/5
Distributor/label: Apocalyptic Witchcraft Records
Distributor/label URL: http://apocalypticwitchcraft.co.uk
Released: 2015
Buy Album [URL]: http://apocalypticwitchcraft.bigcartel.com/product/australasia-notturno-digipak-cd
Band Website: https://www.facebook.com/australasiamusic

notturno
Band line-up:

Gian Spalluto

Track listing:

1 Nebula
2 Eden
3 Kern
4 Creature
5 Invisible
6 Haxo
7 Amnesia
8 Lumen
9 Notturno

Review:

As the clocks go back and the nights creep in earlier and earlier, it seems like the perfect opportunity for Italian post rock outfit Australasia to release their sophmore album, ‘Notturno'(Night). The bands tells us that the album “represents a musical and evocative journey through moonlit landscapes.” A more fitting description you could not get.

The album opens with atmospheric synths layered over ocean sounds and bird song before giving way to drums and destorted moddy guitars in tracks ‘Nebula’ and ‘Eden’. It feels like the days is falling in to darkness and the night is coming to life all around you. Australasia seem to be able to keep the album rooted in this nocturnal world throughout the album with the shogaze undertones created. Having said this the combination of the synths and the moments of higher guitar notes, give you a sense of light guiding you thought the dark landscape. In fact it feels very cinematic, it would be a great alternate score for Interstellar. Listening to ‘Notturno’ I can picture the scenes near the end of that film when Matthew McConaughey is drifting ever nearer to the black hole (spoiler!). This cinematic feel is probably not that surprising as one of the main influences referenced by Australasia founder Gian Spalluto are the film siundtracks of Ennio Morricone.

Most of the songs on this album exhibit the same peaks and valleys hat make up the blue print of most post rock songs. However, the departures such as the female vocales in ‘Invisible’ help, as the band puts it, “paint vivid pictures for the minds eye”. I couldn’t agree more with this and this is what I think sets ‘Notturno’ apart from other post rock albums. The album ends with the final track, also named ‘Notturno’, a delicate piano track that brings us to the end of our nocturnal journey.

I really enjoyed this, it was nice to listen to something that had the ability to transport me to somewhere else and paint a vivid picture of the story and the world that the music was trying to portray.

Review by Mark Hunter
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