Blood Moon – Through the Scarlet Veil

Rating:4/5
Distributor/label: Iron Bonehead
Distributor/label URL: www.ironbonehead.de
Released: 2017
GDOB2-30CH-001.cdr
Band line-up:
The Collective
Tracklisting:

1.I.V. – Fires of Manifestation
2.The Seven-Rayed Star
3.Sacred Flame – Awakening of the Ancestors
4.G.N.O.S.I.S.
5.IAO – In the Coils of the Serpent
6.ΣΕΘ – Chaos in Order
7.O Grandest
8. Psalm of the Nameless – Thy Kingdom Come

 Review

Filled with Luciferian chanting and askewing the usual Black Metal trappings of satanic screeching, Blood Moon manages to pull off a 90’s sounding homage to early Moonspell without the pretentiousness of other more modern Black Metal bands around today. Hailing from Catholic Greece, this satanic themed album brings to mind rooms filled with burning incense, of cowled priests chanting in shadows. It’s an image that’s certainly growing in popularity with bands like Wolves in the Throne Room and Bathuska putting most of those elements into their live shows to great excitement and anticipation from the crowds. 

This album really surprised me, as I’m not a huge fan of straight up Black Metal e.g Mayhem, Marduk e.t.c but like other bands of the genre from Greece (Rotting Christ) they have enough ingenuity to spark my interest and keep me entertained throughout this 8 track offering from this ambiguous band that people know little about. 

I questioned a member of the band recently, as to the band members names and what they did in the band, and their response was to say that no one member would be thrust into the fore and named as lead singer, that they are a collective and committed to working on equal terms within the band. So, foregoing the usual trappings of their genre, they have managed to put out a damn fine album. 

They have not, however, had it easy as their distributor of the CD and tape release of this album has gone bust recently and Through the Scarlet Veil has been now limited to a digital release. That’s not altogether and bad thing and I think you should definitely download this album. 

Review by Nathan Slack
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