The Projectionist – Exalted Solitude

Rating: 3/5
Distributor/label: Independent
Distributor/label URL: Independent
Released: 2017
Buy Album [URL]: https://thetrueprojectionist.bandcamp.com/album/exalted-solitude
Band Website: https://www.facebook.com/The-Projectionist-1021842331170650/

Band line-up:

Lörd Matzigkeitus – Vocals, Lyrics
Malphas – Drums
Don Atkinson – Guitars

Tracklistings:

1. 11 Strikes to Incite Incurable Silence
2. Suckling a Most Hateful Claustrum
3. Ineffable Inner Void
4. Oubilette Threnodies
5. If Erased: So Fertile Ought
6. Draw Away a Disconnect
7. Chapel of Astaroth
8. Zarathustra Within
9. Sleepless Witching Curse
10. Harpy Whispers Malice (The Regent’s Downfall)

Review:

I’m really quite torn about this album so this is a tough review to write.

The Projectionist hail from Canada, a country rich with excellent quality black metal from many different spectrums of the genre.

Until recently I had not heard of The Projectionist so before checking out the album I looked them up online and noticed a recent split with one of my favourite underground Canadian artists, Tomhet, so this was a promising start. Also the sleeve art for ‘Exalted Solitude’ is quite the piece of art, another great sign.

So, the album….

The Projectionist are an interesting band, as the album somehow manages to be both raw and simplistic yet at the same time diverse and obscure. It’s quite a challenging listen, but all in all, compositionally I am quite impressed with the writing, structures and over all themes and vibes throughout.

Abrasive guitars fuzz with menace yet not without melody and dark twists, harsh vocals tear through at the forefront of the mix and dark interludes connect the tracks into an epic entity.

All this sounds great, and in some ways it is, but I feel there are some negatives which slightly impact the experience. Number one is the drums, which are in my opinion not very well done and badly programmed. It’s a shame because this would have made a massive difference to the overall sound. This is something which after a few listens becomes less of a problem for me. Secondly, the overall production is somewhat lacking and at times comes across very amateur.

It would be quite easy to overlook these things but I have to take them into account here and thus it affects the overall score.

It none the less leaves me intrigued about the band and wanting to check out their other releases, and keep track of their future output. There’s a great deal of potential which I feel is waiting to be unlocked!

Review by Steve Blackwood
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