Posthuman Abomination – Transcending Embodiment

Rating: 1/5
Distributor/label URL: Comatose Music
Released: 2018
Buy Album: http://www.comatosemusic.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=7433
Band Website: https://www.facebook.com/Posthumanabomination/

Band line-up:

Max Santarelli – Guitars
Lorenzo Orrù – Vocals
Marco Coghe – Drums
Andrea Pillitu – Bass

Tracklisting:

1.) Transcending Embodiment
2.) Systematic Ecophagy
3.) Cyberbrain Drain
4.) Autogenetic
5.) Apocatastasis
6.) Crafting Life
7.) Simulacra-Simulation
8.) Planned Obsolescence
9.) Posthuman

Review

Credit where it’s due, Posthuman Abomination make no secret of their style. The band name, font used, album cover, song titles: it all makes it abundantly clear what to expect going in. This is brutal death metal, it yells with pride, even if many won’t understand what it’s saying.

Unfortunately, this is also the low creative nadir of the genre, and epitomises what can easily go wrong. Transcending Embodiment is certainly loud, brutal and violent, but that’s all it is, and it all adds up to very little. Like a book that employs a lot of long words for no reason, or a film that uses bizarre cinematography techniques in the same manner, there are some technically impressive aspects to this, but none of them add anything of worth. Every track jumps from riff to drum fill to fearsome growl and back again, but seemingly just to show off that they can do so. It’s brutality and noise for the sake of it, and nothing more, resulting in a gurgling, churning mire of sound.

There’s not a lot more to be said. Nothing stands out or is remotely memorable, other than the overall impression of something technically competent but entirely lacking in rhyme, reason or attention span. Not every album needs to be catchy or accessible, but it needs to have something, some interesting trait to hook the audience. Posthuman Abomination just end up sounding like a thousand other bands doing the exact same thing, something which might have pushed boundaries a couple of decades ago, but now doesn’t sound anything like as hardcore as it wants to.

Review by

Kieron Hayes

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