Paul Ferguson – Remote Viewing

Rating: 4/5
Distributor/label URL: http://www.deadradiostation.com
Released: 2018
Buy Album [URL]: https://bpfmusic.bandcamp.com/
Band Website: https://www.facebook.com/BPF-Big-Paul-Ferguson-678031195875234

Band line-up:

Percussion, voice, and loops – Paul Ferguson
Guitars and additional instrumentation – Mark Gemini Thwaite
Electric Violin on X-Box – Brainshadow

Tracklisting:

1. Hungry Ghosts
2. Reboot
3. The Great Motivator
4. Terrible Warriors
5. X-Box
6. I am War
7. Zarzal

Review:

In 1978 Ferguson became a founding member of Killing Joke and served as their drummer from 1978 to 1987, and he is known as “Big Paul Ferguson.” He departed from the band in 1987 and subsequently worked on other musical projects, notably with rock outfits Warrior Soul (1987–1990), Murder, Inc. (1991–92) and Crush (1992–93). He also briefly played with The Orb. During the following years, Ferguson lived in the United States and Puerto Rico, and became a sculptor and art restorer, specializing in ancient sculptures. Ferguson rejoined Killing Joke for their 2008 reunion and remains with them to this day.

If you are looking for something that doesn’t sound like Killing Joke, well, you are sort of in the right place and sort of not. Some of the drumming and the lyrics are similar to them, but he also incorporates some more mellow and less intense bits. “Zarzal” is a very mellow song with an electronic sound that has a Depeche Mode feel to it, very cool. “XBOX” has some biting lyrics that put down a lot of the crap out there, like watching Honey Boo-boo and rotting your mind. The EP is very well done with the production being clear and crisp, allowing for everything to be heard without anything overpowering another aspect. The vocals are great, no screaming, just singing and some spoken word here and there.

This is a great EP that adds perfectly to the Killing Joke collection, not as a duplicate, but as a sidebar that keeps the high standard that the band has taken. I look forward to more of his solo music in the future.

Review by Rick Ecker

 

 

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