Harakiri For The Sky – Mӕre

Rating: 3.5/5
Distributor/label: AOP Records
Released: 2021
Buy Album: https://harakirifortheskyofficial.bandcamp.com/releases
Band Website: https://www.facebook.com/HarakiriForTheSky

Band line-up:

J.J. – Vocals
M.S. – All Instruments
Kerim “Khrim Lechner – Drums
Neige – Additional Vocals (track 2)

Tracklisting:

1. I, Pallbearer
2. Sing for the Damage We’ve Done
3. Us Against December Skies
4. I’m All About the Dusk
5. Three Empty Words
6. Once upon a Winter
7. And Oceans Between Us
8. Silver Needle // Golden Dawn
9. Time Is a Ghost
10.Song to Say Goodbye (Placebo cover)

Review:

The quirkily titled Harakiri For The Sky have spent the last decade putting their homeland, Austria on the post-black metal map, offering many elongated and existential pieces of well-crafted musicianship on the depressive elements of everyday life in the modern world.

Now the Austrians have returned with the fifth album, “Mӕre”, telling the tale of a mythical folk being that personifies anxiety and fear in all things around us. It’s interesting mythology of modern delirium put to some well-executed black metal mixed with post-rock and some progressive bits.

Vocalist J.J. shrieks and rants over chord after chord making the album like a claustrophobic trip down a rabbit hole into the human psyche and then exploding out into a euphoria of uncertain wonderment when the guitar solos and progressive moments take on the listener.

What really cements the beauty of the musicianship together is drummer Kerim “Krihm” Lechner of SepticFlesh fame. His session drumming pounds into the ears like a storm of water and hail that has you wanting more and more if you love your post-black tunes. To add greater depth to their post-black credentials, Neige from Alcest offers additional vocals on “Sing for the Damage We’ve Done.” On very beautiful addition indeed.

Overall, this is a finely crafted record, but I feel its biggest failure is its length. I will admit to having a low attention span and Harakiri have made long releases in the past, but 84 minutes does feel a little too overdrawn. That being said, it exhibits their strength as musicians and says they won’t be retiring from music anytime soon. A worthy spell of post-black metal magic.

Review by Demitri Levantis
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